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Banksy booby-trapped a painting so it self-destructed after Sotheby's sold it for £953,829

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Banksy's iconic "Girl With Red Balloon" street art went under the hammer at Sotheby's in a custom frame of the artist's own design; moments after it sold for £953,829, a booby-trap kicked in, drawing the canvas into a series of shredder blades built into the frame, rendering it down to a pile of forlorn strips of shredded cloth.

The art speculation market has run white-hot for a decade and more, as inequality floods of dark money has sought highly liquid, tax-invisible assets. As a result, the world's most important art treasures sit in climate controlled containers in "freeports," changing hands without ever moving, seen by no one.

“It appears we just got Banksy-ed,” said Alex Branczik, the auction house’s head of contemporary art, Europe, immediately after the sale. “He is arguably the greatest British street artist, and tonight we saw a little piece of Banksy genius,” he said, adding that he was “not in on the ruse”, although it is not clear whether other members of staff were. Some commented on the unusually thick frame, which could have easily concealed a shredding mechanism.

After a man dressed in black sporting sunglasses and a hat was seen scuffling with security guards near the entrance to Sotheby’s shortly after the incident, speculation mounted that the elusive artist had himself pressed the button that destroyed the work. According to the provenance, Girl with a Balloon was acquired directly from the artist in 2006.

Sotheby’s 'Banksy-ed' as painting 'self-destructs' live at auction [Anny Shaw/The Art Newspaper]

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beslayed
16 days ago
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Sandboxing Cycle

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All I want is a secure system where it's easy to do anything I want. Is that so much to ask?
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beslayed
42 days ago
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6 public comments
DaftDoki
41 days ago
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Life
Seattle
JayM
42 days ago
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Oh, this is perfect. Must pay some royalties for this for the next microsegmentation conversation. So spot on.
Atlanta, GA
tante
42 days ago
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XKCD's sandboxing circle not only applies to tech.
Oldenburg/Germany
Covarr
42 days ago
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You don't have to sanitize your inputs if your application runs in a sandbox that prevents inputs.
Moses Lake, WA
alt_text_at_your_service
42 days ago
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All I want is a secure system where it's easy to do anything I want. Is that so much to ask?
alt_text_bot
42 days ago
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All I want is a secure system where it's easy to do anything I want. Is that so much to ask?

Chicago police data reveals how dirty cops spread corruption like a disease

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In 2009, after a successful public records lawsuit, the Invisible Institute received data on complaints against Chicago Police Department officers since 1988 -- the complaints often list multiple officers, and by tracing the social graph of dirty cops over time, The Intercept's Rob Arthur was able to show how corruption spread like a contagion, from senior officers to junior ones, teaching bad practices ranging from brutality to falsifying evidence to torture to racism to plotting to murder whistleblowing cops. (more…)

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beslayed
48 days ago
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sirshannon
48 days ago
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Bad apples, how do they work?

new disrupt LP “Omega Station” landing soon!

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new disrupt LP “Omega Station” landing soon!

Some serious gravity waves, recorded from the Black Hole near doomed outpost OMEGA STATION

Stay tuned for the full LP, a highly immersive SciFi adventure tale no self respecting space cadet should miss – and the first disrupt solo album in eight years!

This black Monolith of a record is scheduled to drop on limited wax on 20. Sept 2018, but copies of the album will already be available in our Jahtari shop or through Bandcamp pre-order within the next 14 earth days!

→ disrupt

The post new disrupt LP “Omega Station” landing soon! appeared first on JAHTARI.

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beslayed
53 days ago
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U.S. Senator Bans Funding for Beerbots That Don't Exist

jwz
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Senator Flake of Arizona introduced the following amendment to the U.S. Department of Defense appropriations bill currently in Congress:

None of the amounts appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act may be obligated or expended for the development of a beerbot or other robot bartender.

The issue here is that Senator Flake is conflating a student demonstration of how research could potentially be applied (delivering beer) with the fundamental objective of the research (in this case, multi-robot planning under uncertainty). Senator Flake also does not make any reference to what the objective of the research actually was: solving real-world logistics challenges. Instead, he seems to think that MIT was using government funding to develop a commercial robotic bartender, and his solution is to amend the DoD budget to prevent something that wasn't even happening in the first place, from happening again. [...]

"This is unlikely to actually be a 'misunderstanding'." Instead, Levitan says, Senator Flake is most likely using this research as an opportunity to take on supposedly wasteful spending, by finding perfectly reasonable government funded research projects that can, says Levitan, "be made to sound ridiculous when put a certain way. He almost certainly does it on purpose, ignoring the true value of the research and counting on the public to not be well enough informed to push back. And no fact-checking happened because that would have ruined the bit."

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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beslayed
53 days ago
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nominal determinism?
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satadru
47 days ago
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"moderate Republican"
New York, NY
jimwise
54 days ago
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...

Post-prison punishment for life: The American way

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In the US, a criminal never “pays his debt to society.” The prison term may end, the punishment continues. Read this sobering column by Lincoln Kaplan in the New Yorker. It concludes:

. . . But the bulk of his opinion—the reason federal judges throughout the country have been sending it to one another as a cutting-edge view on an important issue in sentencing—is about why he “rendered a non-incarceratory sentence.” He wrote that it was largely “because of a number of statutory and regulatory collateral consequences she will face as a convicted felon”—restrictions that the federal government, as well as every state government, imposes on anyone convicted of a crime, but especially a felony. A broad range of the restrictions, he said, “serve no useful function other than to further punish criminal defendants after they have completed their court-imposed sentences.”
Block asked the U.S. Attorney’s office and the Federal Defenders of New York, which represented Nesbeth, to provide him with a list of the collateral consequences that she faces as a convicted felon. The government identified what it described as the “handful” that are “potentially relevant.” The loss of a driver’s license is the least onerous. She is also ineligible for student grants, loans, or work assistance for two years, and banned for life from receiving food stamps and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, though Connecticut could grant her an exemption. She and her family can be denied federally assisted housing for a “reasonable time,” and she cannot be issued a passport until her probation is finished, which matters to Nesbeth because, as her lawyer told the judge, her “father, grandmother, and extended family all reside abroad.”
The judge recounted that federal law imposes considerably more than a handful of consequences, “nearly 1,200 collateral consequences for convictions generally, and nearly 300 for controlled-substances offenses.” Nesbeth’s counsel, Amanda David, of the Federal Defenders, said federal laws will make it difficult for her client to become an educator because they provide money “for background checks of all employees of educational agencies,” and a conviction for a drug felony “can be used as grounds for denying employment for potential employees who want to be involved in providing care to children under age 18.” David also reported that Connecticut automatically bars anyone from getting a teaching certificate for five years after being convicted of a drug felony.
David’s memo to the judge about collateral consequences began with a quotation from Michelle Alexander’s influential book “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.” David is concerned that its thesis will apply to her client. Alexander writes, “Many of the forms of discrimination that relegate African Americans to an inferior caste system during Jim Crow continue to apply to huge segments of the black population today—provided they are first labeled felons. If they are branded felons by the time they reach the age of twenty-one (as many of them are), they are subject to legalized discrimination for their entire adult lives.”
The main conclusion of the judge’s opinion is that, while the law allowed him to take account of the civil penalties when he sentenced her, there was nothing he could do to protect her from them. He joined criminal-justice experts in encouraging Congress and state legislatures “to determine whether the plethora of post-sentence punishments imposed upon felons is truly warranted,” and suggested that they do the country “more harm than good.” He didn’t say so, but for many legislatures that would mean carefully assessing these punishments for the first time. As the criminal-justice scholar Jeremy Travis wrote, in 2002, legislatures have often adopted collateral consequences in unaccountable ways: “as riders to other, major pieces of legislation,” which are “given scant attention.” They are, Travis said, “invisible ingredients in the legislative menu of criminal sanctions.”
The judge made clear why the severity of collateral consequences—authorizing discrimination in education, employment, housing, and many other basic elements of American life—means that anyone convicted of a felony is likely to face an arduous future. This predicament has been called modern civil death, social exclusion, and internal exile. Whatever it is called, its vast array of penalties kicks in automatically with a conviction, defying the supposedly bedrock principle of American law that the punishment must fit the crime.


Filed under: Daily life, Law, Law Enforcement
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beslayed
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